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BOOK
JAMAICA PROVERBS
AND CULTURE
EXPLAINED
ISBN 1899341099
book preview

BOOK
Anancy Stories Book
Companion to the
CD ROM
ISBN 1899341110
Revised edition

JAMAICA TONICS
ISBN 1899341234
£14.99

Phonics Fun
ISBN 1899341129
UK English phonics

CARIBBEAN CARNIVAL

ANANCY STORIES
ISBN 189934117
£9.99 (UK ISBN)
audio CD

THW WOLFS' SHARE

AESOP JAZZY FABLES
ISBN 1899341080
£7.99 (UK ISBN)
audio CD

Caribbean Fruit& Veg videos

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HOME PUBLICATIONSFREE STUFFPHOTO GALLERY GAME MICRO SCIENCE FICTION

Slavery - Candles would not burn
The air below decks where men, pregnant women, babies, and nursing children were chained was so foul that candles would not burn – they were all dubbed prisoners of war and so could be shipped away to slavery.
“… because of the great heat that is there continually, which is sometimes so excessive that the surgeons would faint away, and the candles would not burn.”
John Newton
British Slave Ship surgeon (circa 1757).

THE NUMBERS
Two British infantry regiments, other troops, hired parties, and another body of militiamen were sent against the Cudjo Maroons (new specially trained regiments were shipped to Jamaica to eliminate the Cudjo maroons because the existing soldiers on the island were loosing skirmish after skirmish).
We know from written records that the size of a British regiment in 1795 was 1000 men (usually more) – the 83rd regiment of foot soldiers who attacked the Trelawny maroons in 1795 consisted of over 1000 soldiers.
So two regiments would be 2000+ solders, add the ‘other troops, hired parties, and another body of militiamen’ and the numbers are easily over 3000 soldiers, however there would have been other regular soldiers stationed in Jamaica, at least one regiment (technically 4000 troops).

At the signing of the treaty the British army claimed there were 600 Maroons from this we can estimate that less than 300 were warriors, in truth the real odds were something between 15 well armed and trained British soldiers to 1 Cudjo Maroon.

MAROON HERO
THE 452 YEAR WAR